smashsurvey:

For two days, we surveyed the fan presence for the narrative podcast Welcome to Night Vale here on tumblr. Commonplace Books’ horror/mystery series follows the broadcasts of Cecil Palmer, a radio host in the town of Night Vale. Cecil’s dynamic with his boyfriend Carlos is a frequent feature on the show and has been a point of contention with homophobic bloggers on the site before, but now it seems WTNV’s diverse cast and progressive stance has attracted a new kind of scumbag attitude. 

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So, is the WTNV fandom community racist? 

We asked the tags if they thought the community that formed around Night Vale had turned unwelcoming towards people of color and interpretations of figures on the show as characters of color — and, specifically, if they’d seen accepted white supremacist and overtly racist attitudes in what should be safe fan spaces. For a show as progressive and accepting as Night Vale is, the results were upsetting. 

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source: smashsurvey    via: fashiondisastercecil
April 17, 2014     665 notes

Anonymous writes,

you are a pretentious prick who is also a transphobic piece of trash, go to hell

midwintersoldier:

fishingboatproceeds:

There is so much of this stuff in my ask box, and most of it not even anonymous, but I don’t want to call out any particular user because I know they’ll then get a lot of hateful asks and the cycle will just continue.

First off, there’s a comma splice in your ask. I just have to let you know that, on account of how I’m a pretentious prick.

I hope that I’m not transphobic. I’ve been public and vocal in my support for the rights of trans people for years, and I’ve tried over the years to amplify trans voices, from T Cooper to Stephen Ira Beatty, rather than pretending to be able to speak for them. 

Look, I am a person, and I am not a particularly good one. I am screwed up and make a lot of mistakes. But I am not a piece of trash. I would imagine that you are also screwed up and make a lot of mistakes, but you aren’t a piece of trash either.

But it is still hurtful—very hurtful—to hear people call me a piece of trash. It just makes me sad to hear, the way I think it would make most people sad to hear. The certainty and lack of nuance in that characterization reflects a broader lack of nuance in online discourse these days that just bums me out. 

I’m sorry, but this is not the time to correct someone’s grammar. It’s really NEVER all that useful, cause clearly you still understood the point the person was making. And really, the only point of grammar is to understand people. Also this is totally tangential but a lot of people use ‘grammar’ to deny nonbinary trans people the right to use their own pronouns, but that’s a secondary thought that I think you should remember. It’s also super ableist always to make fun of grammar. 

Anyway, no one cares that it hurts you to be called those things. You said “t*****” in your defense of Laci Green’s use of the word, and to my knowledge you never apologized. If you did? Ok, but keep in mind you are still cis and trans people are under NOOO obligation to forgive you. And as a non-binary trans person I’m not particularly interested in your feelings about being called ‘transphobic trash’, given that it will more than likely not lead to violence against you, and you know what? No matter how much you do, you probably are transphobic. Even if just a little bit. I have NEVER met a cis person that wasn’t at least slightly transphobic.

When someone calls you this (or multiple people as you seem to imply), put your money where your mouth is and listen instead of making a majority of your response about your feelings. Trans people don’t care about your history with trans activism. Trans people don’t care what you SAY. You’re allowed your hurt feelings, just don’t expect them to be catered to when trans women of color can literally be murdered on the street and never get justice.

April 17, 2014     20,351 notes

Before John Green, his general category of realistic (non-fantasy) YA was rife with teen angst and “issues” fiction that you might have associated with the legendary Judy Blume, or with newer writers like Sarah Dessen or Laurie Halse Anderson. Anderson’s classic 1999 novel Speak, about a high schooler struggling to deal with the aftermath of sexual assault, was so influential that three years later Penguin launched an entire imprint named after it. One of the books launched under the behest of Speak was Green’s Looking for Alaska. But it’s Green whose name you’re more likely to know today, not Anderson’s, although Anderson has won more awards and written more books.



On Twitter, Green has 2 million followers. Compared to the rest of the leaders in Young Adult fiction, that number is staggering. To approach even half the Twitter influence of John Green all by himself, you need an entire army of YA women. Anderson, Blume, Dessen, Veronica Roth, Cassandra Clare, Richelle Mead, Margaret Stohl, Kami Garcia, Rainbow Rowell, Maureen Johnson, Malinda Lo, Holly Black, LJ Smith, Ellen Hopkins, Shannon Hale, Lauren Myracle, Libba Bray, Melissa Marr, and Leigh Bardugo: As a group these women only have about 1.2 million followers on Twitter.

That’s the voice of one man outweighing several decades of women who have had major successes, critical acclaim, and cultural influence.

"Young Adult Publishing and the John Green Effect" (via delicatedad)

When a man succeeds in a devalued (because of its association with women) field, he legitimizes it in popular opinion.

(via survivorsuperhero)

I continually see this and I find it worrisome that people latch onto this article despite it creating a false narrative of the growth of young adult fiction. It’s analysis and criticism are entirely off-mark when you expand the scope to include more than the last fifty years in literature.

Do you notice how that initial list only includes modern writers of past few decades? Instead, start from the advent of reading for enjoyment. In the 19th century, stories and novels for children surround the adventures of young boys. The most memorable being those of Charles Dickens and Mark Twain. Women did have success as well in this time period, Louisa Alcott’s Little Women, and Lucy Montgomery’s Anne of Green Gables. The latter being the story of a girl adopted by a family who wanted… a working a boy. What differentiates the two sides is the same as what the article in the above describes, in their respective life time, the men had greater media presence than the women.

Move towards the latter half of the 20th century, and the most defining YA novels are Lord of the Flies and Catcher in the Rye. Catcher in the Rye is even referenced by John Green in the above article as an example of ubiquitous misogynistic messages in mainstream and academically-accepted novels. These books receive greater mainstream presence than those of women, whose visibility was on the rise, such as: I Know Why the Caged Bird SingsThe Outsiders, and To Kill A Mockingbird.

I also wonder why you act as if John Green having more twitter followers than the rest of those female authors. Have those authors been making videos for the public since 2007 and hosting cons? It is almost as if the article writer doesn’t understand that John has better press and a greater audience that he created himself. That isn’t even part of the system of oppression women face, that is just normal. Women have faced unfair discrimination since the formation of the YA fiction as a genre. The article writer, and you the reader, are both falling for the same trick! You are scapegoating the presence, the face, of one man because at this time he has the greatest media presence. The discrimination is not in John Green’s success, but in the publishing houses that focus on his success in the place of other women and persons who also deserve attention. Critiquing John Green’s success is a critique towards those who enjoy his work instead of the publishers who value him over their female authors. I’m very critical of trying to value women authors by lambasting John when his fan is mostly female https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OyJb2nzAZIk. Is devaluing the likes of other women the proper way to make female authors more visible? Focusing on John Green is not only diverting our attention from the real cause, discrimination within the publishing house and ingrained social norms, it causes us to use our resources on the wrong thing. Instead of criticizing a man who is not actually a problem, just a symptom, we should openly and proudly applaud female authors and express how we enjoy their work and the fact that they are women telling stories from their perspective. Asking “Why is John Green more successful than his female contemporaries?” doesn’t help us solve the problem. The real question is “Why do these other, worthwhile, female, authors fall to the wayside?”. Even the entire article shows John consistently agreeing that he believes sexism is rampant in the industry.

The other articles written by this journalist seem to mostly be click-bait disguised as activism. I can’t judge, such is life for a commercial writer. However, I think the topic of feminism and literature is important.

http://ladybusiness.dreamwidth.org/38016.html

While just the writings of bloggers, this article analyzes the gender of literary prize winners over the last decade. It is filled with statistics and charts for better understanding. Unlike the above article, it is not twitter quotes, surreptitiously chosen to form a story that will rake in the page views.

(via kumi-himo)

source: bookshop    via: kumi-himo
April 17, 2014     21,141 notes

Before John Green, his general category of realistic (non-fantasy) YA was rife with teen angst and “issues” fiction that you might have associated with the legendary Judy Blume, or with newer writers like Sarah Dessen or Laurie Halse Anderson. Anderson’s classic 1999 novel Speak, about a high schooler struggling to deal with the aftermath of sexual assault, was so influential that three years later Penguin launched an entire imprint named after it. One of the books launched under the behest of Speak was Green’s Looking for Alaska. But it’s Green whose name you’re more likely to know today, not Anderson’s, although Anderson has won more awards and written more books.



On Twitter, Green has 2 million followers. Compared to the rest of the leaders in Young Adult fiction, that number is staggering. To approach even half the Twitter influence of John Green all by himself, you need an entire army of YA women. Anderson, Blume, Dessen, Veronica Roth, Cassandra Clare, Richelle Mead, Margaret Stohl, Kami Garcia, Rainbow Rowell, Maureen Johnson, Malinda Lo, Holly Black, LJ Smith, Ellen Hopkins, Shannon Hale, Lauren Myracle, Libba Bray, Melissa Marr, and Leigh Bardugo: As a group these women only have about 1.2 million followers on Twitter.

That’s the voice of one man outweighing several decades of women who have had major successes, critical acclaim, and cultural influence.

"Young Adult Publishing and the John Green Effect" (via delicatedad)

When a man succeeds in a devalued (because of its association with women) field, he legitimizes it in popular opinion.

(via survivorsuperhero)

source: bookshop    via: fashiondisastercecil
April 17, 2014     21,141 notes

vocavoid writes,

nice to meet you Eros! my name is void. do you have a favorite animal?

zdk13eros:

A bottomless pit

April 16, 2014     715 notes

zeeenya:

KICKSTARTER TO PRINT VOLUME 1 OF TODD & PETUNIA JUST LAUNCHED!!!!!!!!!!

Yes… this is the thing I’ve been working on secretly for the last little while… I’m biting my nails like nuts…

This is a Kickstarter to fund the printing for volume 1 of Todd Allison & the Petunia Violet. It’s an approximately 176 pages full-colour book with a dust jacket and a pull-out poster. The book will be 7 by 9 inches. It’s basically my dream book.

If you go to the Kickstarter page, you can watch a video where I talk about my comic in a fragile voice. PLEASE… ENJOY… (OR NOT…) 

EVEN IF YOU CAN’T CONTRIBUTE, I’D REALLY APPRECIATE REBLOGS TO HELP SPREAD THE WORD… THANK YOU GUYS SO MUCH!!! HAVE A GREAT DAY!!!!!!!

April 16, 2014     2,719 notes
sweet theme, bro.